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Bill's Long Way Home

Bill Lucas left Vietnam a First Lieutenant and proceeded to take "the long way home." For years, he traveled across the world.
Here for the first time is his commentary along with the pictures he took and developed himself.

Kabul Marketplace No. 5 | Early 1970’s
A stall next to the Kabul river shows the various sides of the country with the woman in the burqa, the donkey carrying its load, and the modern buildings.  The pace of life was definitely slow but most seemed comfortable and there were few beggars (compared with India and Pakistan where they were everywhere in great numbers).

Kabul Marketplace No. 5 | Early 1970’s

A stall next to the Kabul river shows the various sides of the country with the woman in the burqa, the donkey carrying its load, and the modern buildings.  The pace of life was definitely slow but most seemed comfortable and there were few beggars (compared with India and Pakistan where they were everywhere in great numbers).

Khyber Pass 2 of 2 | Early 1970’s
These are some forts built by the British on the Khyber Pass road.  When the British tried to conquer the Afghans in the 19th century, they ended up retreating through this and all were lost except one person who carried the news back to India.  

Khyber Pass 2 of 2 | Early 1970’s

These are some forts built by the British on the Khyber Pass road.  When the British tried to conquer the Afghans in the 19th century, they ended up retreating through this and all were lost except one person who carried the news back to India.  

Khyber Pass 1 of 2 | Pakistan, early 1970’s
This picture is from the same viewpoint as the picture from the Khyber Pass’s wikipedia page, taken in November 2005: 

“Taken at the site where the Khyber Pass starts to climb high into the mountains, Looking back towards the Pakistan side”

Khyber Pass 1 of 2 | Pakistan, early 1970’s

This picture is from the same viewpoint as the picture from the Khyber Pass’s wikipedia page, taken in November 2005: 

Taken at the site where the Khyber Pass starts to climb high into the mountains, Looking back towards the Pakistan side”

Bill in a Chair 2 | Kuala Lumpur (year unknown)

Bill in a Chair 2 | Kuala Lumpur (year unknown)


And We’re Back | Bill in a Chair, Kuala Lumpur
We just received over 600 more of Bill’s slides from his long trip home.  The time for resting is over!

And We’re Back | Bill in a Chair, Kuala Lumpur

We just received over 600 more of Bill’s slides from his long trip home.  The time for resting is over!

Like Father, Like Daughter. | Libya 2011
My daughter is currently in Libya working with the Campaign for Innocent Victims in Conflict (CIVIC).  
“In Misrata & all is well.  This little girl was super cute.  Her dad put her in my arms.  Yes, I am an awkward holder of children but she was HEAVY.  The peace sign she is doing is the rebel sign for victory.”

Like Father, Like Daughter. | Libya 2011

My daughter is currently in Libya working with the Campaign for Innocent Victims in Conflict (CIVIC).  

In Misrata & all is well.  This little girl was super cute.  Her dad put her in my arms.  Yes, I am an awkward holder of children but she was HEAVY.  The peace sign she is doing is the rebel sign for victory.”

Tagged with:  #libya  #color  #travel  #humanitarian  #war
A chopper’s view of Vietnam’s rice paddies.  One of the few pictures I took that has a weapon anywhere in the frame.

A chopper’s view of Vietnam’s rice paddies.  One of the few pictures I took that has a weapon anywhere in the frame.

Tagged with:  #Vietnam  #color  #travel  #war
Dhulikhel, Nepal | 1969Coming up from the main road from Kathmandu into the village.  Because the country is so hilly, this type of terraced farming was everywhere.  The countryside looks hardscrabble but they manage to grow most of the food they need despite the often inhospitable weather.  The people in Nepal are friendly throughout and the scenery so out of the the familiar that it was one of my favorite places.  I even talked my daughter Liz into going there for her junior year abroad but unfortunately they had some political upheaval so that trip was scrubbed.
The water buffalo looks very comfortable and though it was hot, I had no urge to join it.  This one of the few color shots that I have been printed so far. 

Dhulikhel, Nepal | 1969
Coming up from the main road from Kathmandu into the village.  Because the country is so hilly, this type of terraced farming was everywhere.  The countryside looks hardscrabble but they manage to grow most of the food they need despite the often inhospitable weather.  The people in Nepal are friendly throughout and the scenery so out of the the familiar that it was one of my favorite places.  I even talked my daughter Liz into going there for her junior year abroad but unfortunately they had some political upheaval so that trip was scrubbed.


The water buffalo looks very comfortable and though it was hot, I had no urge to join it.  This one of the few color shots that I have been printed so far. 

Tagged with:  #nepal  #color  #1969  #photography
Kabul, Afghanistan | 1970
This is just a typical street scene in the center of the city.  At that time, it was peaceful and very friendly toward itinerant foreigners.  Generally you could photograph pretty much what you wanted with the exception of the tribal women, which was prohibited.  The city was a mixture of modern men and women in western dress and people from the hills straight out of “The King of the Khyber Rifles”.  It was exceptionally beautiful with the mosques, the bazaars and the parks everywhere.
Three of us (2 Australians and me) came to Kabul by bus from Peshawar, Pakistan over the Khyber Pass where the remnants of the old British forts could still be seen.  Across the aisle from me was an old man looking like he had fought the British and sat there in his robes and turban holding a long ancient rifle.  He smiled at us but waived away any pictures - we complied.

Kabul, Afghanistan | 1970

This is just a typical street scene in the center of the city.  At that time, it was peaceful and very friendly toward itinerant foreigners.  Generally you could photograph pretty much what you wanted with the exception of the tribal women, which was prohibited.  The city was a mixture of modern men and women in western dress and people from the hills straight out of “The King of the Khyber Rifles”.  It was exceptionally beautiful with the mosques, the bazaars and the parks everywhere.

Three of us (2 Australians and me) came to Kabul by bus from Peshawar, Pakistan over the Khyber Pass where the remnants of the old British forts could still be seen.  Across the aisle from me was an old man looking like he had fought the British and sat there in his robes and turban holding a long ancient rifle.  He smiled at us but waived away any pictures - we complied.

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Bill's Long Way Home by William Lucas is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
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All images copyright © William Lucas | All text copyright © William Lucas 2011

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